“circumstantial evidence”

The circumstances in Haiti have me living with my heart outside of my chest.  What I see is too much for me.

I can’t understand why these people must have their suffering prolonged by the rest of the world’s inability to get them the help they need.  Like most people who are removed from a position of ability, I have a thousand solutions discovered on my cozy couch.  To those who have the least information, the solutions are always elementary.

As with so many other things in life, there is more to what is going on in Haiti than what is visible to the eye.   In fact, the more we rely on our eyes to define a situation, faith escapes us.  “Now faith is the assurance of things hoped for, the conviction of things not seen” Hebrews 11:1.

Haiti requires we look beyond the circumstantial evidence and pull up our bootstraps of faith. 

Haiti requires a faith that is assured God is present in Haiti–He sees the suffering and He is close to the broken-hearted.

Haiti requires a faith that is convinced we are completely helpless–but we are hoping in One who is not.

Haiti requires a faith that is assured God is who God has always been.  It’s easy at times like this to put our faith in what God is (or seemingly, is not) doing.  But that’s not the faith of which the Scriptures speak.  Instead, we draw deep from wells of conviction that God is not what He does.  When God met up with Moses at the burning bush, He didn’t give Moses a time capsule report of all the things He planned to do.  Instead, He told Moses who He was, “I AM,” and the one thing Moses could take to the bank, “I will be with you.”  No Genie-in-a- bottle tricks, just a pronouncement and a promise.  “By faith…for he endured as seeing him who is invisible” Hebrews 11:27. 

Haiti forces us to ask ourselves, “Who do I really believe God to be?”  Once we’ve answered the question, we have to consider if our answer is enough to call forth the kind of faith for which this moment calls.

What about you?  What do you see when you look at Haiti?

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